Content Marketing for small businesses. It’s ok to be imperfect.

So, you already know that it’s vital, if you want to successfully promote your business online, that you regularly put fresh content onto your website and onto social media (right? If not then read our post which covers basic digital strategy and SEO).

The problem is how on earth do you find the time and how do you create all of this relevant, engaging (and maybe viral) stuff?

At Narrative (previously THBOOM!) we often see businesses begin with the best of intentions but who over time, gradually stop putting anything new online. We stress to clients the importance of developing customer personas, editorial calendars et al, of developing quality content and of leveraging in-house expertise to create blog posts and white papers. These techniques will certainly help you to generate and target quality content, but they can seem intimidating and sometimes you just need to get something up there. It really is better to have something new on your website than to be paralysed into inactivity by the quest for perfection (or by the day-to-day demands of running your business).

Imperfect action is better than no action.

Don’t have time to blog about your latest product? Then simply post a picture of it onto Facebook instead. Can’t get a picture of the new product? Then take a snapshot of the product team deep in discussion and put that up instead with a quick line of text about how the new product is imminent.
Can’t finish that long piece intended to help your customers avoid buying the wrong thing? Then simply link to some pre-existing advice online with a short introductory paragraph of your own. This is an important idea; you’re not going to be able to generate 100% original content so instead you need to “curate” content. Post links to useful content that you find online and add some thoughts of your own.

Link to a funny video that has some relevance to your customers. Put up a weekly list of things you liked on the web. It’s easy once you start doing it.
The important idea is not the quality of the content but its relevance to your customers. Sure, there’s no doubt that you need high quality content on your site and it’s important that you don’t spoil it with low quality filler, but when you sense things slipping it’s time to act… even if it’s less than what you might hope for.

The more you act the easier it becomes. You will become more efficient at creating content and you will also learn more about what works best for your customers.
Over time you will feel more confident about getting those important larger, quality pieces completed… and before you know it you will finish that e-book.

And did you see what I just I did here? I did exactly what I’m talking about… I put up a quick, imperfect (but hopefully still useful) post.